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What You Missed – Oct 18-25

Didn’t catch the news? We got your back.

 

This was a big week, so we’re here to catch you up since you were making your Halloween costume.

Joe Biden not running for President

Joe Biden not running for President

The potential candidate long seen as a backup to Hillary Clinton announced he was not running Wednesday.

“Unfortunately, I believe we’re out of time,” he said outside the White House, according to the New York Times. “… while I will not be a candidate, I will not stay silent.”

Speculation around a potential run from Biden had gone on since the summer, after his son told him to run before he died in May. However, Biden told 60 Minutes Sunday that it wasn’t some “Hollywood-esque” thing.

With Biden deciding not to run, the Democratic field for President is now just former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, and former Maryland Governor Martin O’Malley following the withdrawals of former Virginia Senator Jim Webb and former Rhode Island Governor Lincoln Chafee.

 

 

Hurricane Patricia slams into Mexican coast

Hurricane Patricia slams into Mexican coast

History’s most powerful hurricane, Hurricane Patricia, hit the Pacific Coast of Mexico Friday, but with little damage.

The storm had sustained winds of over 165 miles per hour. The storm hit an area of the Pacific Coast that was sparsely populated, avoiding major cities Puerto Vallarta and Manzanillo, according to the Weather Channel.

The relatively little damage and deaths, 6 in total, were attributed to the geography of western Mexico, which helped to break up the strength of the storm, according to USA Today.

Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto expressed gratitude that the storm was not as damaging as expected, and pledged to help rebuild the communities affected, according to NBC.

Liberal Trudeau wins big in Canadian elections

Liberal Trudeau wins big in Canadian elections

The Canadian Liberal Party won an outright majority in the federal election on October 16, giving the office of Prime Minister to Liberal Party Leader Justin Trudeau.

The Liberal Party won 184 seats out of the 338 seats in Parliament, earning them a clear majority with 39.5% of the vote, according to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.

The Conservative Party, which ran the government before the election, now holds 99 seats, a loss of 67 seats from the last election in 2011. The left-wing New Democratic Party, the other major party in Canada, won 44, a loss of 59 since 2011, according to the CBC.

Trudeau had campaigned on a platform of marijuana legalization, an end to airstrikes against ISIS, and action on climate change, according to the BBC.

Carson tops Trump in Iowa

Carson tops Trump in Iowa

A Quinnipiac University poll released Thursday shows Ben Carson leading Donald Trump in Iowa at 28% to Trump’s 20%, with a margin of error of +/- 4.1%.

Carson, who had been making gains in the polls since the second Republican Debate on CNN, also raised the most money in the Republican field, and third overall in the third quarter.

The poll, which was conducted from October 14-20, asked 574 likely caucus voters who they were planning to vote for.

In third place, polling at 13%, was Florida Senator Marco Rubio, in fourth place at 10% was Texas Senator Ted Cruz. In a tie for fifth place at 5% were former Florida Governor Jeb Bush and former HP CEO Carly Fiorina.

Sesame Street debuts first character with autism

Sesame Street debuts first character with autism

On Wednesday, People Magazine tweeted that the popular children’s program Sesame Street will debut its first character with autism.

The muppet, named Julia, plays with Elmo on the playground in the online storybook. Elmo explains to his friend Abby Cadabby that Julia “does things differently. Sometimes Elmo talks to Julia using fewer words and says the same thing a few times.”

Sesame Street partnered with 14 organizations, including Autism Speaks and the Yale Child Study Center, according to CNN.

One in 68 children is affected by autism spectrum disorder.  Boys are more susceptible than girls, with one in 42 boys affected while only one in 189 girls is affected, according to the CDC.

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